Bondi’s Morning Mo Sistas raise awareness (and money) for prostate cancer.

“For all our dads, granddads, brothers, uncles, sons, buddies, best friends and men in our lives. These Mo’s are for you! The Morning Mo Sistas are wearing a Mo each day…”

Bondi beach surfer girls Mo sister

Photo courtesy of Morning Bondi

This Movember the surfer girls of Bondi Beach are getting mo-tastic with their hairy upper lips. Each morning the Morning Mo Sistas meet on Sydney’s beautiful eastern beach and go surfing…sporting their very own moustache! Not just for surfing shenanigans, the girls are wearing the facial hair every day for the whole month of November to raise awareness (and your cash) for prostate cancer.

“While my father has shaped who I am, this month he is shaping my face. Inspired by my father’s strength, confidence and courage I’m wearing a moustache every day of Movember to raise money and more so awareness of prostate cancer and men’s health. And my beautiful girlfriends, who I surf with almost every morning now that I live in a different city to dad, are also wearing moustaches.” – Charlotte Connell from Mo Sisters

Pick a Mo for the Morning Mo Sistas

Morning Mo Sisters is an initiative that Charlotte Connell is leading following her surf-loving father’s battle with prostate cancer for the last seven years. Surfing is the special sauce that seems to bind them: sharing waves, surf trips and memories. Read Charlotte’s heart warming story below and make sure you head to the fundraising site to support this great cause. You can even a pick out a Mo for them to wear on any day in November.

If you’re around in Sydney, make sure you pop down to Bondi Beach at 7am to catch the Morning Mo Sista surfer girls in action.

Donate to this great cause here – we wish your dad the best of luck Charlotte in his battle with prostate cancer. x

Bondi beach surfer girls Mo sister

Photo courtesy of Morning Bondi

Charlotte Connell’s heart warming story

Some men shake hands, my dad hugs. I was about 12 when my dad chose family over career, he left a high positioned job to work from home and be with us.

Throughout my teenage years I’d be woken at 5.45am by a tap on the door and a whisper ‘It’s time to go’. The car was packed, surfboards strapped to the roof and we were ready to watch the sunrise between sets at our favourite surf spot.

I envy my dad’s patience and am constantly reminded of how much I lack it. When I was learning he would persist with me until I was confident without frustration and forever encouraging. We’ve been surfing together for more than 15 years and not a session goes by without him smiling at me proudly, congratulating me on each wave. And not a wave goes by where I don’t look for his adoring eyes.

I’m not sure how old I was, I think primary school, when I asked my dad who his best friend was. Without missing a beat he said his father. I found this hilariously absurd at the time and couldn’t understand why. ‘How come?’ My father explained how he not only loved, admired and respected my grandfather but as he grew from a boy to a man his father became his comrade. 20 or so years later my best friend’s answer isn’t so absurd. 

Bondi beach surfer girls Mo sistas

Photo courtesy of Morning Bondi

Despite his broad shoulders, my dad’s strength is in his character and while standing 6’4 tall, a natural leader, he is a gentle man. His retention for knowledge is undeniably incredible so much so that he is known as Wuffapedia, a play on his nickname, but never too proud to admit he is wrong or too stubborn to learn something new or hear a different opinion.

The life before he became a family man fascinates me. He is still close to his university friends who have told me on more than one occasion about the day Wuff grew a moustache. He went from a tall gangly geeky guy to a ladies-man-surfer-god overnight. This, no doubt, explains why he has kept that fabulous bit of facial hair for the last 45 years.

And despite seven years of battling prostate cancer, which has now spread through his bones, and even a round of chemotherapy he hasn’t lost that spectacular moustache or his spark for life and surfing. Ever the optimist my dad, when faced with the debilitating spread of the disease booked in a family holiday/surf trip to Bali recently. Paddling out and watching my dad glide across a wave in front of me is a moment I’ll treasure always.

While my father has shaped who I am, this month he is shaping my face. Inspired by my father’s strength, confidence and courage I’m wearing a moustache every day of Movember to raise money and more so awareness of prostate cancer and men’s health. And my beautiful girlfriends, who I surf with almost every morning now that I live in a different city to dad, are also wearing Moustaches.

Bondi beach surfer girls Mo sistas

Photo courtesy of Morning Bondi

Donate to this great cause here

1 Comment

  • Beautiful story Charlotte. And those who know and love your dad too can vouch for every word you’ve written about him. Go you Mo girls, go! X

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